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African American Health

Minority Health - Healthy Living Tips for Kids

Make sure your children receive regular check-ups and have their shots on schedule. Teach your children good health habits like regularly washing their hands, good oral hygiene (brushing and flossing their teeth). Help children avoid unintentional injuries. Have them wear a helmet or other protective equipment if they are riding a bike, skateboarding, or rollerblading. All small children should be in a child safety seat or seat belt when riding in a car. Also make seat belts a requirement for teens who have a license and their friends who ride with them. An adult or older teen should be present for activities like swimming—encourage use of the "buddy system" for swimming. Teach your children basic water safety techniques and how to swim. It could save their lives. "Childproof" your household by covering electrical outlets and keeping all drugs and cleaning products out of the reach of young children. Have the number of your local Drug and Poison Information Center posted near the telephone. Talk with your children and be involved in their lives and schoolwork. One concerned adult in the life of a child can make a tremendous difference in how well a child does. Talk to your children about drugs and teach them about sex before they begin experimenting on their own. The older they get, the more information they need. All information should be age appropriate. Teach them your values. Know who their friends are and what kind of behavior they engage in. Peers have a powerful influence on teens.

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Last Reviewed: Aug 21, 2009

Kenneth   Davis, Jr, MD, FACS Kenneth Davis, Jr, MD, FACS
Professor of Surgery and Clinical Anesthesia
College of Medicine
University of Cincinnati