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Breast Cancer

Breast masses

07/05/2007

Question:

I`m 28.5 years old. I had pain in my left and right breasts since 5 months ago. When I went to see the doctor last month, he found one hard mass on right breast and three soft mass on left breast. I had an ultrasound. Masses are close in size (approx 1.6 x 2.3 x 1.5 cm) they are movable masses on the left breast, and hard mass in the right breast. I had Mammogram and result was nothing observed in both breasts. Some Consultants advised me to make biopsy, and I did by needle, and they couldn`t get out anything from the mass. I’m so afraid and worried from it. Other Consultants advised to repeat the Ultrasound after 6 months, without biopsy because - they said - it is just fibro adenoma. But actually I’m very worried. Is it common to have more than one fibro adenoma at the same time? How can be treated so it will not return? Is this a form of breast cancer? Is it malignant? Do I have to surgically remove them? What will happen if I don’t remove, in spite that it is painful especially before period (sick time)? If I have cancer, what will happen? Note: Does Faverin medicine (it is for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) effect in my situation, because I already took it for 55 days since 6 months ago.

Answer:

Multiple benign breast masses, such as fibroadenomas, are certainly possible.  Fibroadenomas can be removed, but it is not absolutely necessary.  If they are left in place, they should be monitored to make sure that they aren't growing.  If they enlarge, they should probably be removed.  Palpable masses that do not appear on mammogram are also possible, but should be evaluated further, either with ultrasound, MRI or biopsy.  Usually, masses that are painful, especially before periods, are benign and related to fibrocystic disease.  I am not aware of Faverin causing any of these problems.

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Response by:

Doreen M Agnese, MD Doreen M Agnese, MD
Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery and Internal Medicine
College of Medicine
The Ohio State University