Home HealthTopics Health Centers Reference Library Research
Join us on Facebook Join us on Facebook Share on Facebook

Dental and Oral Health (Adults)

Swollen face and gums after temporary crown

01/22/2008

Question:

had a broken tooth, got an infection that was cured with antibiotics.The dentist said that maybe I didn`t need roor canal if the nerve was alive, whihc did not seem the case. He intalled a temporary crown and proposed that then he would take it away in some time and see if the nerve was alive or not. The morning after the tempory crown was done i woke up with the face swollen and terrible pain. i called the dentist and he said thT it meant i needed root canal and said that fluids that could leak before were clogged now by the crown and they werebacking up creating the swolenness. I went to an endodontist immediately and he said that I had an infection and gave me amoxicilin and ibiuuporfen, etc. The pain is still horrible regardless of analgesics and my face and gum are still totally swollen. I called him to suggest to get take the crown out and he said definitely no and gave me a stronger antibiotic that I have started taking today Friday afternoon. Nothing has changed. Does anyone have any idea if this is normal, is it because of the crown setting or could it be an allergy to the material, rather than just an infection of the pulp?

Answer:

Hopefully by now you are feeling better.  Having facial swelling because of an infected tooth is a fairly common process.  Once the swelling has started, it takes about a week to completely resolve and antibiotics don't even get into your system and start working for 24-48 hours.  If your symptoms are worsening or not resolving in a timely fashion follow up with your endodontist.

Please see the following answers to other questions similar to yours:

Related Resources:

Recent root canal
Black eyes after a root canal?

For more information:

Go to the Dental and Oral Health (Adults) health topic, where you can:

Response by:

Melissa McCartney Drum, DDS, MS Melissa McCartney Drum, DDS, MS
Assistant Professor of Endodontics
College of Dentistry
The Ohio State University