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Urinary Disorders

Daughter`s Symptoms and Urinalysis Results

02/18/2009

Question:

My daughter (18 years of age) recently went to the doctor due to a variety of symptoms that have been occurring over the last four months. These symptoms have included: Fatigue (tiredness even after a full nights rest and/or napping), nausea/vomiting (following a meal or snack), severe to mild adominal crapping, loss of appetite (unable to eat without feeling nauseated or vomiting, and weight loss (15 pounds: 5`4" was 120 lb now 105lb), feeling of weight on chest, difficultly breathing, persistent cough.

Recently she had a episode of vomiting and abdominal cramping (not just stomach, but full abdomen-radiating to the back) that lead to dry heaves. The only thing she had been able to eat that day was 2 small bites of a chicken strip.

A full blood and urinalysis was completed. The reason for posting here is that the majority of results that were out of range were a result of the urinalysis. Following are the only items that were out of the reference range. Cholesterol 174 CO2 20 Urinalysis: Appearance Cloudy Protein 1+ Epithelial Cells >27 RBC 4-10 Bacteria Moderate

Her doctor said that the results did not indicate anything and that she probably had bronchitis and prescribed her antibiotics for this.

My question is do these lab results, coupled with her systems warrant a second opinion? Are these lab results indicative of the symptoms that she is having or other illness in which should be further investigated?

Your help is much appreciated. I feel like my daughter is wasting away and her doctor is not taking her symptoms seriously.

Thank you, One worried mom

Answer:

Having blood in urine along nausea and vomiting warrants further investigation such as CT of the abdomen to see if she may have kidney stone. Other suggestion would be pregnancy, food poisoning, etc., for which she should ask for another opinion.

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Response by:

Ahmad  Hamidinia, MD Ahmad Hamidinia, MD
Formerly, Professor of Clinical Surgery
College of Medicine
University of Cincinnati