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Mouth Diseases

Bump on Roof of Mouth

03/11/2010

Question:

i have a small bump on the roof of my mouth on the right side it is quite hard and has been there for around 5 to 7 months not too sure.Sometimes it can be uncomfortable but its not painful,i cant stop touching it with my tongue and im really scared of what it may be.It is ruining my life im so depressed and cant stop worrying about it.Please help any ideas what it could be.I am 25 female and have smoked for around 10 years ive given up completely now as i am so frightened any advice would be so very gratefully appreciated many thanks.

Answer:

To begin with, if you are so concerned with this lesion and it has been evident to you for over 6 months, why have you not gone to your primary care provider or dentist to have it evaluated?

There are a number of possible lesions that may be present, and without being able to examine it and illicit a medical and dental history I can only give you a list of the possibilities.

 

It could be nothing more than a localized inflammatory response to trauma, or inflammatory hyperplasia. How large is this “bump”?  Is it growing? What color? Is it smooth or rough? Is it fixed or movable? Is it fluctuant (can you squish it or is it very hard or is it rubbery)

 

As I mentioned it could be nothing more than a fibrous connective tissue overgrowth, However, it could be the tissue response to an infected tooth (parulis or chronic hyperplastic pulpitis), a benign mesenchymal tumor (hemangioma, neuroma, lipoma, lymphangioma) a cyst, a viral induced papilloma, or a salivary gland lesion (minor salivary gland tumor) benign or malignant, there are a multitude of possibilities.

In order to definitively diagnose the situation, you really need to have it examined, and have it biopsied to definitively diagnose what is occurring. I realize that you are very concerned but the longer that you wait and hope it goes away may be working against you if it is something more than a benign lesion.

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Response by:

Richard J Jurevic, DDS, PhD Richard J Jurevic, DDS, PhD
Formerly, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences
School of Dental Medicine
Case Western Reserve University