Home HealthTopics Health Centers Reference Library Research
Join us on Facebook Join us on Facebook Share on Facebook

Gum Diseases

Gum Graft Sutures

11/12/2010

Question:

I recently had a gum graft performed over one of my canines which had a recession exposing the root. This tooth is slightly turned forward and is crowded to where it sort of in front of the teeth on the other two sides. Within 3 days of the graft, the sutures placing the graft on the tooth had come loose, and some had even come out. Once finding the sutures on my tongue I called my perio and they re-sutured it although saying that part of the graft had been lost but it should not be a big issue, just may not get full coverage. At this time he also re-sutured the roof of my mouth because he said they were coming loose. After this I was in much more pain than the initial procedure and took 2 days off work. Almost a week after being re-sutured the sutures on the graft ripped again, which I go back to the perio in a couple days. Is it possible that this just simply will not work for me? The first time the sutures tore was while I was asleep, but I am unsure when or how they tore the second time. I have since paid closer attention certain things. My natural facial movements at times pull my front lip up and then also when I am lifting something I get a strong pull from the area above my lip directly in front of where the graft would have been. The thing that brought to my attention that the sutures where torn this last time was that I no longer felt that pull when I sneezed. I am a heavy sneezer, so when I did I could feel strong tugging from the sutures. Are these things that could cause the sutures to rip out or is it something else? And if these are parts of the cause then is there a way to circumvent it from occurring again?

Answer:

Generally sutures become loose due to post-operative swelling (if the patient is not playing with the site). So you probably had some significant swelling, and the tooth is already rotated (meaning a little out of dental arch). These areas are hard to suture.

I hope that you are feeling better now.

For more information:

Go to the Gum Diseases health topic, where you can:

Response by:

Binnaz   Leblebicioglu, DDS, MS, PhD Binnaz Leblebicioglu, DDS, MS, PhD
Associate Professor of Periodontology
College of Dentistry
The Ohio State University