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Diet and Nutrition

Verdura y Frijol con Arroz Jambalaya

Vegetable, Bean, and Brown Rice Jambalaya

A diet high in fiber and low in saturated fat is key to a healthy colon.

Jambalaya (pronounced JUM-ba-LY-a) is a Louisiana Creole dish of Spanish and French influence. The vegetables, beans and brown rice in this festive Jambalaya recipe contribute beneficial fibers, which will aid peristalsis - a.k.a involuntary contractions - in the colon, which promote regular bowel movements and, in turn, colonic health, thereby minimizing the risk for colon cancer. With an array of savory spices, this delicious recipe is low in sodium and fat, but full in flavor. The beans are high in protein. However, unlike animal sources, beans have no saturated fat. The vegetables are high in fiber and contain antioxidants, such as beta carotene and vitamin E. Whether eaten as a side or the main event, this Jambalaya recipe will have you dancing to the tune of a healthy colon. 

Ingredients

1 medium onion, finely chopped
1 cup chopped celery
1 cup chopped green pepper
1 cup red or yellow bell pepper
1 cup sliced fresh mushrooms
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon olive oil
3 cups chopped fresh tomatoes
2 cups water
1 cup uncooked long grain brown rice
1 can black beans
1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon paprika
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/8 teaspoon chili powder
1/8 teaspoon pepper

(Note: Spice to preference)

Directions

1. In a large nonstick skillet, sauté the onion, celery, bell peppers, mushrooms and garlic in oil until tender. Stir in the tomatoes, water, rice, parsley, black beans, salt, paprika, cayenne, chili powder and pepper.

2. Transfer to a 2-1/2-qt. baking dish coated with nonstick cooking spray. Cover and bake at 350 degrees F for 65-70 minutes or until rice is tender and liquid is absorbed.

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Last Reviewed: Sep 09, 2013

James H Swain, PhD, RD, LD James H Swain, PhD, RD, LD
Assistant Professor of Nutrition
School of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University